secrets to scale

Secrets To Scale Podcast
038 - The Power Of Habits With Tiffany Peterson

038 – The Power Of Habits With Tiffany Peterson

Secrets To Scale is a marketing and entrepreneurship podcast that revolves around hearing the stories of successful entrepreneurs and uncovering their secrets to scaling their businesses. Music for every episode of this podcast was written and produced by Treycen Clausse.

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Tanner:

This week on the show, I have Tiffany Peterson, founder of The Lighthouse Principles. Tiffany is a business coach and keynote speaker. And we talk about what it’s like starting and growing a business without a lot of resources, as well as some power habits that will make you successful in every area of your life. Tiffany is an amazing person and you’re going to get so much value out of this episode. Welcome to the show, Tiffany, I’m super excited to have you. Go ahead and introduce yourself to the audience.

Tiffany:

Hi friend. Thank you so much for having me and welcome to all of those of you that are listening. It’s nice to meet you. I’m Tiff, or Tiffany, Peterson. And I just love that we were just talking about this before we clicked record. I love what I get to do in the world. I mainly hold a lot of space for humans. We call it coaching, but we hold space as they work through their stuff and come into alignment, let go of the limiting and the negative as well as set very proactive and specific goals and help them create what it is that they desire. So I’ve been in the sales and life coaching world on my own for a little over 11 years. Prior to that, I spent time with some great brands, Franklin Covey, Rich Dad, Poor Dad, Jack Canfield, and helped them make millions of millions of dollars with their products and programs and coaching. And so, yeah, it’s just been quite a journey and quite a ride, but I love the experience of being part of people’s growth. And so that’s what I’m up to in the world, business-wise.

I wrote in my little journal one day that I wanted to work for Franklin.

Tanner:

Awesome. So let’s go back in time a little bit. How did you get your start in sales? What’s your story? How did you decide that’s what you wanted and how did that transition into coaching?

Tiffany:

Yeah, so I had maybe a little entrepreneurial bike when I was little and had lemonade stands. So, you know, my very first beginning to sales, but I never—I think it’s really important to say this—I never in a million years that I’d been sales and like you, you probably have awareness that I had a lot of judgment about what that meant. You know what I mean? Like, oh gosh, you don’t want to be in sales or that’s like the leftover path or career, not understanding that life is sales and relationships and communication and adding value and solving problems and all of that. But initially I thought I was going to be a special needs school teacher. And I was at school at the University of Utah and I worked in three classrooms over two years as an aide to elementary education classrooms.

Again, I thought I was a traditional classroom based teacher, and I’ve always had a soft spot for kiddos and kids with challenges and that’s the path I was on. And then I happened to go on a double date in college and met this woman whose dad owned a training and development company. And I was fascinated by it because again, it was training, it was learning, it was education, but in the business world. And so a couple months later I happened to see an advertisement for them in my college newspaper. And I ended up going to work for them and my path changed. And as they say in that moment, you knew getting down that path. I became aware of Franklin Covey and long before I knew about like goal setting and what we might call manifesting, or even law of attraction. I wrote in my little journal one day that I wanted to work for Franklin.

And within eight weeks of that journal entry, I was working for their coaching division, selling coaching programs over the phone and helping people make a decision to sign up and work for a coach. Now it’s important to know that this is long before the coaching industry had become a mass adapted concept. And we were still explaining to people what a coach was because they’d be a tennis coach or a football coach. And you know, it wasn’t this mass adapted conversation where in 2021 today when we’re meeting and recording, you know, everyone knows about coaching and has had a coach or has several coaches and there’s all kinds of coaches, but this was back in 2001. My friend, when I first started coaching and selling coaching for them, I’ve watched that whole industry shift, but I didn’t go into sales intentionally.

I got into personal development and I was so passionate about helping people work with a coach and change their lives. And I became phenomenal at selling. But I used to have so much judgment, so much fear and resistance because again, we all have a mindset about sales, right? The old scripts and tapes that it means you’re pushy, sleazy, see, you know, aggressive used car salesperson. You know, we have some of that energy or that fear around it. And when you really come to understand for me, I’ve had to go through both a mindset and a skillset shift on that to realize that really being great in sales means you help more people authentically and genuinely get their needs met with whatever it is. You’re up to like your gift in the world with marketing, you help people grow their exposure to the thing they’re passionate about, but whether you’re in real estate or beauty products or health and wellness, whatever you’re up to in the world, the reality is, sales is part of it.

Whether you’re for-profit, non-profit, school systems, getting your kids to go to bed on time and like eat their vegetables is a sales process. So just realize that I had to go through a full mindset shift, but that’s a little bit of the background of how I got down the path a little over 11 years ago, I left corporate America and launched my own little business with not a lot of know-how and not a lot of resources, but a passion and some skills and got out there and with a little bit of faith mixed in there too. And here we are, 11 years later, I’ve had an incredible journey.

Tanner:

Yeah, that’s really awesome. And I want to get into what that journey was like once you went on your own, but first I just want to just say how much I hate used car salesmen.

It’s never about you, either direction.

Tiffany:

I know, right? So you can understand that where I get hired to help someone grow their sales, and we do sales training meets mindset and personal development work together, combined that life and sales coaching, but everyone at some level gets to work through that. As that fear of being perceived, see most people, their issue is like they don’t actually have a fear of selling. They have a fear of being perceived a certain way. And they’re trying to manage that image or perception. The fear of being again seen as that kind of a person, because none of us want to be identified that way yet when you come back to that, the heartbeat, the crux of selling, when you’re, mission-based in your marketing, you’re a powerful force to be reckoned with. And you come from a place of service, right?

I’m most often speaking to different companies, corporations, direct sales conferences, you name it. My most popular keynote is called Serve More to Sell More. And when you come from a place truly of service, like, hey, I’m here to add value and I’m here to connect and share. When you reached out to me and said, Hey, do you want to do a show together? It’s like, sure. You’re not paying me to be here. It’s not this. It’s just like, cool. Let’s collaborate and share some good things and put good content out in the world. I love that. You’re doing that. And so I think for again, most humans, their issue is really about their fear of being seen a certain way. Their fear of being perceived that way versus what’s your mission statement. What’s your purpose statement and that will help you with that mindset of I’m here to serve and add value. Then whether they say yes or no to your offer, it’s never about you either direction. You can influence that, but foundationally it’s about, hey, I’m here to make an offer of service and add value when you’re adding value, you create and receive value as well.

It’s time to take action and move things forward and try it.

Tanner:

Yeah. I couldn’t agree more that it really is about leading with value, but I think most importantly, it comes down to relationships, right. People don’t buy from businesses or brands, they buy it from people. But let’s talk about when you went on your own what was that like in the very beginning, how did you get started and what were some obstacles that you faced right off the bat?

Tiffany:

I love thinking and talking about this and cause I think it’s also wise to normalize the entrepreneurial struggle at times, right? I was very naïve, I just had a lot of passion about what I was doing. I had a small savings account, but I did have a skillset of selling and I just remember getting out there, but every month my friend that first year was man, a tight rope. And every month as I would pay my mortgage and I’d watch my savings account, you know, just like lower and lower and lower, I’d get on my knees and pray regularly, you know, faith and spirituality is a big part of my life. And as I would pray, I just remember, I’d have the same reassurance every month. The course, things are working out, and it was much of a faith walk as those things can be.

But again, I just consistently followed through and connected with people and reached out and was willing, I was willing to fail. I was willing to take a lot of what I call imperfect action, right? Like one of my favorite questions to put out there from coaching is this question: “Am I willing to take imperfect action to achieve my goals?” If I was waiting for it to be perfect myself, my marketing, my messaging, my demo reels or my book or products or content, if I would’ve waited to be perfect at that, I wouldn’t be here today. 11 years later, running a thriving business is that I was willing to take a lot of imperfect action. And that’s actually my own podcast show has been out for about 18 months. And my very first episode is about that taking imperfect action because as you know, as someone who has a show and all the things in action, you’ve taken as the willingness to say, I’m going to try this.

Like my very first live event I ever hosted, friend listen to this, my very first live event. This was February of 2010. I hosted a little one day success strategies, workshop. And I had a little room down at the grand America and we had 37 people sign up for my very first one day event. And for most that’s not bad, you know, like it’s a good out of the gate until you pull back the curtain and know 30 of those 37 people were my friends and family doing me a big solid to like cheer me on to be part of this new venture. And I say that because now fast forward, 11 years later, I’ve hosted events with a thousand plus people in the room.

Plus I’ve been on lots of other people’s stages with thousands and thousands of people. And I’d never had what I had today, if I was still waiting for it to be perfect. And so I was feeling like let’s host my first event. I’d never done an event. You learn a whole lot though by doing it, then trying to think about it. And I love like listening to podcasts. I love reading good books, but then there comes a point of like, it’s time to take action and move things forward and try it. And some things I’ve done had done really well and some things fell flat on their face, you know, different launches over the years. It’s just the willingness to say, I’m willing to take imperfect action, you know, to move and progress. And that’s really what life is about for all of us, let alone a business is progress equals happiness. I remember Tony Robbins saying that once, years back and it’s so very true. And so the willingness to progress, what progression comes from learning different ways of things not to do, or what’s effective, what’s not effective to help someone grow.

Tanner:

Yeah. I really love that. You know, it is about progress, not perfection. And I can say the same things about my first podcast episodes, and it’s not even that long ago, less than a year ago. Not very good, but I did that on purpose because I wanted to be able to go back and say, okay, I just did this. I knew it. Wasn’t great, but I knew I was going to progress.

Tiffany:

Yeah. And look at you now. And it’s like, look how much you’ve learned about podcasting and starting something new that, and your willingness to do it. And I think that’s really, you know, I think that’s the crux of entrepreneurship at some level. A lot of times humans get stuck at what I call the train station of getting ready to get ready, to get ready, to get ready, right? To launch, to grow, to write the book, to start the thing, to put the thing, what they want out there. Again, a form of perfectionism often, but perfectionism is just dressed up fear, right? We all know that fear is one of the big culprits we all face off with in our lives, but really it’s looking at perfectionism, waiting for it to be perfect. It’s really just pretty fear.

It’s like fear in a Gucci handbag, you know, it’s hot couture, fear dressed up. We let perfectionism sometimes run the show and they get a lot of that when you get underneath. It is again, back to the fear of being perceived a certain way. I don’t want to look foolish. I don’t want to sound like an idiot or I don’t want to get it wrong. So I’m going to wait and tell, I feel more confident. We’re waiting for a feeling before we’re going to move it forward. And I think about like how we’re ultimately connected today, you know, Thomas Edison failed a whole lot to create electricity. And yet the willingness to do that is the heartbeat of entrepreneurship and creating anything of value and of greatness is the willingness to start.

Tanner:

Yeah, yeah, no question. You just got to get the ball rolling. You can’t worry about what anyone else thinks. And you know, I had that feeling of fear when I published my first podcast episode and I was like, you know what, I’m just going to be myself. I don’t care what people think. I’m just going to do it. And that’s the kind of mentality that you have to take in order to do something that’s really going to contribute to your life in a meaningful way.

Tiffany:

Yeah. So very true. My friend, I love that you’ve created the space to have these conversations so way to take action.

I think about success as a recipe.

Tanner:

I appreciate that. So Tiffany, what would you attribute your success to over the years?

Tiffany:

Can I share more than one thing? I think about success is kind of like a recipe, right? There’s a few ingredients there. It isn’t just one thing. And while we could be here for three hours talking about multiple things, I think the conversation around this is that a couple of key things, at least as one is having a really clear passion and purpose. I know we hear about that, but more than that, just being a cute meme on Instagram is one thing, but what’s your why? You have a passion and a purpose. And for most, for it to be sustainable, comes back to some kind of value of service, contribution, growth, doing it for your family. Like something that really truly motivates you because you will face any path you’re on. Whether you’re self-employed, corporate employed, you name it, you’re going to face discouragement at times and challenges and having something that really grounded to your why, why do I want to do this?

And what’s my purpose. And then capturing that, why I’m a big believer of having that written down or an artwork, you know, I’m surrounded or in my home office with a couple of pieces that really ground me to my purpose, that might be a piece of jewelry or something like that. But I think purpose is a big part of it. Secondly, I’d say I’m a big believer of mentoring, right? Coaching as someone who coaches, other people, I’ve had lots of coaches and then specifically mentors as well, people who help hold you accountable to your best self and they push you, they nudge you, and mentoring of people who are down the path from you. They’ve already created what you’ve wanted to create. So in the third one that I would say is the power of nourishing, a thriving mindset, nourishing your brain on a regular basis with the positive is definitely one of those influential aspects to someone’s success, right?

The power of your mind, your mind is like a little mini movie and you’re creating there first. And then secondly, in your physical life, I remember when I worked for, Franklin Covey, one thing Covey taught was that he would say that all things are created twice, spiritually and mentally, and second physically, there’s always two creations. So similar to like an architect that maps out the plans of a home, you or a building, you first similar in your life is mentally that you’re in creation mode and that you are then physically creating in your life. And so whether it’s your financial goals, career, marriage, you know, relationships, your health wellness is spending time to nourish your mind. And whether that’s through podcasts like this and, and great books and, and things like that, but it’s spending time with consciously nourishing your brain. I’m a big believer in self care, period.

Having great self care habits is a powerful way to influence our lives. And our success is that we see self care is the fuel and, you know, doing things to move our body and nourish our brain and spirit and hearts. And I love, love to think about it in that way too. But those are the key things I would say is looking at purpose and mentoring as well as mindset slash self-care habits that help you create or influence your success. What’s one you would say, I’m curious that you would lean into that. That helps create success.

Tanner:

For me, I think it’s perseverance similar to what you mentioned when you were talking about getting your business off the ground, walking along that tight rope and just having faith that things will work out as long as you’re, you know, doing everything in your power to advance your business in ways that it needs to go. I’d say perseverance is a big one. Just not taking no for an answer, just refusing failure. At least for me, that’s made a big influence.

Tiffany:

So very true. The willingness to keep going. I know there’s a movie I fell in love with years ago. I watch every like autumn around Labor Day and the beginning of college football, the movie Rudy. And I love it for that reason is just, I do like college football for sure. But it’s such a movie around that very thing you just said is perseverance that life and sales and success, doesn’t always go to the person that’ the most talented or the most attractive or has the best education, but to the person who’s the most persistent. And I fell in love with that movie. I’ve actually met the real Rudy of that movie. A couple of times, we’ve had dinner a few times. He’s good friends with a mutual friend of ours and it’s just, I love him. I agree with you. His perseverance is one of those things that just make such a difference.

Tanner:

Well, that’s awesome that, you know, Rudy in real life speaking of habits, what would you say are a few habits that have contributed to your success?

The power of the personal touch is a really powerful habit to help nourish your business.

Tiffany:

Yeah. I love this question and I love, there’s a book by James Clear called Atomic Habits. If you haven’t read it that I highly encourage you to read or download, I don’t get paid or anything like that endorsed of his work, but I love his work on habits. And I think about, for my own, like one of the most powerful habits I adopted several years ago is a morning ritual that I start my day with some intentional nourishment and activities versus just running into my day or my technology right out of the gate. And we all know this. We probably all practiced it at one time or another, but it’s to be consistent in that to just make a decision like, hey, I’m not starting my day on my cell phone. I’m starting my day with reading or prayer or meditation or a workout is the way we start our day shapes our day, that habit is a game changer and I call it even the sacred 10.

Cause I understand like some people listening, they’ve got little kids or they’ve got a really full plate right now and trying to carve out a full hour before they go to work or, get into parenting mode is quite a bit to ask. But the sacred 10, the first 10 minutes of your day that you begin with, maybe that’s prayer, maybe it’s reading meditation, a gratitude journal, but you’re doing some things that help nourish you somewhere physically, mentally, emotionally, or spiritually before you are on the errand of someone else. The minute I pick up my cell phone, I’m on someone else’s agenda, right? There’s text messages. Or if I open any of my apps or my email, you know, it’s other people’s stuff. And even though a lot of that’s very inspiring, I follow a lot of inspiring people. I think it really matters that we first nourish ourselves and that we do that, that habit is such a powerful game changer.

And that one for me is one that has really made such a positive, powerful difference. The second habit that I’m a big believer of in business, especially a big believer of the handwritten note. And that might sound interesting. But as that is a habit for me, I love beautiful stationary. I have lots of it in my home. I have a little cubby in my office space that’s got all kinds of beautiful stationary and blank cards, things like that, but some form of nourishing your relationships, right? You mentioned that earlier about we are in the relationship business. And so whether that’s setting up a lunch date going, getting together phone calls, sending flowers or a gift basket, but a lot of again, I call it the handwritten note. The power of the personal touch is a really powerful habit to help nourish your business.

We’re all in the people business. I’ve grown a business off that principle. I’m not perfect at that, but I’m sure committed to often sending those handwritten notes and, and putting the love back out there and referrals, or, you know, acknowledgement, spending time with people and doing those things. But that’s also a really powerful habit in my business you know, showing up to appreciate others and to help them feel seen and significant all humans have the same coordinates as different as we are. We have different tastes in music or political or spiritual aspects or movies that we love that the reality is core. At the core as humans, we have the same needs, which is to feel seen, to feel respected, valued, to feel important, to feel heard, and when we help meet those needs with other people, we’re deepening that relationship. And so that’s a habit that I’m really conscious of in practice on a weekly basis. It even shows up in my calendar to remind me, you know, on a, on a consistency with that to nourish and show up, to appreciate the people in my life personally or professionally that I want to, you know, invest in. That’s another powerful habit for me.

Create, produce, focus and do those things.

Tanner:

So I was really excited to do this interview because I was excited to see what kind of habits you had mentioned, because I know that’s something that I need to improve on. But along the same lines, you know, entrepreneurs are really infamous for not taking care of themselves. You’ve mentioned self care lot for the average entrepreneur. What does that look like?

Tiffany:

I love that years ago, a friend of mine, who’s a great entrepreneur as well, he actually does a lot of content for entrepreneur magazine. His name is Scott Duffy and shout out to him. He’s a great friend. I remember years ago, he was saying, and he’s a great business strategist. And he was saying, you know, how many of you really are serious about wanting to grow your business this year? You know, and of course everyone’s like me, me, me, and you’re thinking, you know, in marketing, are we going to talks about like the latest marketing techniques and strategies and things. And he said, if you’re serious about growing your business this year, work out every day. And it was one of those kind of moments, you know what I mean, Tanner, where it’s like, wait, what? Because you’re expecting like some kind of the latest, greatest gadget or algorithm thing or whatever it is that’s up in that particular time.

But when he said that is so true, it’s like, everything is energy and you are energy. And often, you know, we talk about, do I have enough time? And we make it about time management. I’m busy, busy, busy, but I ask myself as well as folks, I get a coach, I ask them regularly, the question is, do you have enough energy to achieve your goals? We often say, do I have enough time? But we’ve all had the experience where we have time left in the day or the evening, but we’re so cooked energetically. We just like vege out for the night, you know, and we maybe have three or four hours. We could work on that book or, you know, be more present in relationship or whatever it is that we’re wanting. But we’re just so tired that, you know, we kind of do the zone out behaviors.

And so I really loved that advice. And I think, you know, it’s different for each person. I do have a free self care guide on my website where you can download and go through this quadrant worksheet that looks at body mind, heart, spirit. And it leads you through identifying a few simple habits and simple changes that are like the rudder on a ship. That simple change can really with time that compound interest make a massive deposit into your own self care, your self-confidence. So my website’s www.TiffanySpeaks.com and there’s a tab at the top that says free resources. And if you click that, there’s a couple of free resources there. And the second one is the self care guide. And that’s a great where people can go deeper and make it custom to them because it’s different for each person. Some people listening, they’re already rocking their workouts, but maybe they’re really needing more time for their joy list or their meditation practice.

And so that’s a great resource to help with that. I just think that it’s prioritizing it to say, okay, I’m going to invest in the vessel as I like to call it your energy economy. You’re clear as an entrepreneur that you want to increase your economy financially, but invest in your energy economy because everything’s an energy game is do you have enough energy to, you know, create, produce, focus and do those things. And none of us myself included do this perfectly, but we sure can start to shape some new habits with those things in place.

There’s also times in my life where I have to recommit to the same habit.

Tanner:

In your opinion, how long does it take to create a habit?

Tiffany:

Well, I remember when I worked for Covey, you know, they would talk about the 21 day rule. It starts and you start to see in three weeks where something starts to become a little more natural, where you’re like, Hey, if you’ve done it every day for 21 days, but then I’ve read some other things too, that tuck around the 90 day mark. Right? And I really like to set goals in 90 day increments. And we’ve just crossed the path into for this year, a new quarter. But anytime you listen to this, you can choose to create change. So I think there’s somewhere between, you know, you have that 21 day to 90 days, I think is where something really becomes, you know, more settled and more consistent. That’s also why I love to coach in 90 day increments is someone’s at a place where cool, we’ve established some habits.

There’s some patterns, there’s some new things. And they’re seeing the momentum. Of them launching into that. But I’d say somewhere in there is what I’ve seen and observed, but there’s also times in my life where I have to recommit to the same habit I was committed to 10 years ago, you know, where it’s like, oh wait, that’s right. I want to be moving my body every day or creating more content on a regular basis. And so, you know, that’s something that I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that where you recommit. It’s just that realizing, okay, how do I make this more habitual again? James Clear’s work, Atomic Habits is a great resource for that too.

Tanner:

So what would you challenge anyone listening to start? And in terms of habit, what’s one habit you would challenge anyone listening to start doing today?

Tiffany:

Yeah. I would say too, it’s a combo is I would say begin your day with intention and end your day with some intention is hearing about a morning ritual we’ve all or power hour, you know, morning miracle. There’s a whole lot of things that are out there that talk about that. But if you’re not living that, it’s one thing to know it. Like if you’re hearing us talk about this right now. I know that. But my ask of you is your coach in this moment is, am I living it because knowledge doesn’t change your life no matter who’s on his podcast, no matter whose show we’re all listening to, or what you’re reading is coaching and podcasts and content of any kind can inspire us, but what actually changes your life or the actions that you take. And so I would say, do I have a morning ritual?

And again, looking at mental mindset, spiritual, physical, and then secondly, on the other end of your day is putting yourself to bed with intention to more of an evening ritual, to be more intentional about that. And so perhaps you have a 30 minute window or an hour or more, whatever that looks like for you, where you’re off your technology before you sleep. And maybe you do a gratitude journal or have a hot cup of tea, or do a hot soak or read or something that helps you unwind or kind of put yourself in a more intentional place, because the way you put your brain to bed and the way you wake your brain up have, has a lot to do with your mood and your mood determines a lot of times for all of us our follow through, right?

Like how often we follow through, like when we quote, feel like it. Well, so it’s influencing your mood, which is of course influenced by your mindset. So having some habits in the beginning of your day and the end of your day, where you’re just more intentionally bookending your day, I think is again how you go, okay, cool. I’m really going to be moving the needle with my productivity, with what I’m following through on, because I’m more, you know, again, nourished versus just falling into bed or, you know, waking up and scrolling my phone. I’m going to be more intentional about being a creator of my day in that timeframe. Bookending it? Morning and night.

You’re set up to scale yourself or set up for growth because you have those things that are in place.

Tanner:

Yeah. I really love that. It’s really powerful. So, Tiffany, what would you say your secrets to scale are?

Tiffany:

You know, I love systems, right? And I love having systems that help support you to do that. And systems can be everything from like your email management software to your onboarding process, to mentoring right, to the creation of product or content and things of that nature is looking at okay, where do we put those things in to the system where they fit and are they things I own? Are they other people’s roles? You know, who’s doing what? And that there’s that kind of clarity of ownership. I think that’s a powerful way that how you’re prepared to then scale your business for growth, because you have systems that support you. So anything that you see or that has done, especially in your business repetitively is think about how can we put that again into a system. And so again, all those various tasks or projects is a way to consider, and then you’re set up to scale yourself or set up for growth because you have those things that are in place.

I know for me, when I’m coaching someone else, we often work on getting to, you know, a 70%, 30% or 80% space where 70 to 80% of the businesses, there’s a lot of systems in place or support other people that help run the business. And then there’s that 20% to 30% for innovation, creativity, as well as the personal touch where you’re nourishing relationships. I know I already said this, but honestly I do believe absolutely in systems. And like you’re saying, so you’re set up to scale, but as you know, like your real capital is in relationships. And so even when you have a very systematized business, you never want to let go of the power of the personal touch, where you’re out connecting and whether that’s on a golf course or lunches, or again, the handwritten note or you’re spending time together is to really nourish your relationships.

And to have that personal touch time systems can hopefully give you the freedom to do of that. Right? So you’re set up for that. But whether it’s your marriage or your sweetheart, personal relationships, children, parenting as well as of course, business is you can systematize things like in a home too, but what makes really a home, a home or a marriage, a real thriving marriage is are we connecting? Are we nourishing? And the same thing goes for business to business is very personal. So I love systems because they can help things with more efficiency and for growth and other support players yet always still keeping an eye on that part of your business of how you also quote scale is you’re spending time nourishing. The very people that you know are either bringing you business, referring business, buying from you. And that they’re, that those relationships are deepening because we all do businesses. As you know, with those we know like, and trust like that’s sales one Oh one, right. But it’s prioritizing that regularly as part of your business growth, too.

Tanner:

Yeah. I really liked that, never put it that way before. Of course, processes and systems are incredibly important to scaling any business because that I liked that you talked about the relationship aspect of it, because I always say that my two secrets of scale are people and processes. So I think you hit the nail on the head. So Tiffany, what’s a great way for anyone listening to get in contact with you?

Tiffany:

You can find me my website, my main hub is www.TiffanySpeaks.com. There’s lots of free resources, my own podcast on iTunes, Spotify, or Stitcher. You can follow me on Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook, any of those ways. There’s lots of ways we can connect of whatever most speaks to you.

Tanner:

Awesome. Well, we’ll be sure to link them some of those avenues in the show notes. Thank you, Tiffany.

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